From A Grateful Society – We Say Thank You

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Current President of PNG Society for Rural and Remote Health, Dr Hogande Kiafuli, presents Dr David Mills with a bamboo burnt art piece in thanks for all he has done for medicine, in particular rural medicine, in Papua New Guinea

Recognising the immense contribution of Dr David Mills, the founder of the PNG Society for Rural and Remote Health as well the instigator plus engineer of the Masters in Rural Medicine (UPNG) program.

As many gathered to farewell the Mills family at Kompiam on Saturday 26th November our present president reflects the following:

Jimi district in Jiwaka province is one of the most remote in Papua New Guinea. I travelled to Middle and Upper Jimi on my way to Kompiam this weekend and experienced firsthand the struggles of accessibility that the people of Jimi have when it comes to accessing primary medical services.

Jimi district represents the many rural and remote (and some isolated) places in Papua New Guinea where accessing primary medical care is limited by poor road access; where winding and narrow is the path to accessing a doctor; where pastures of medical care is brown. The government of Papua New Guinea has tried various approaches to solving this issue but all seemed to be superficial, symptomatic and reactive solutions.

There needed to be a change of approach – a paradigm shift. A systemic approach that foster unity of influence; a systematic approach that ensure uniformity amongst diversity; a synergistic approach that bonds vital parts for a better whole. A shift from reactive to proactive. If the people are unable to access a doctor, then let us enable the doctor to access the people.

God’s will to improve rural medical health in Papua New Guinea was instilled as a vision in David Mills and his family. With grits, guts and grind, but most importantly God, the family relocated from Australia, the land down under, to Kompiam District in Enga Province, a land out further. They came as missionaries, and visionaries, carrying seeds of change from God that will transform rural medical service in Papua New Guinea.

One seed was planted in the fertile soils of Kompiam Health Center. Out sprouted the now blossoming tree of Kompiam District Hospital, which is one of the best rural hospitals in Papua New Guinea. A second seed was planted still at Kompiam, where it now is blooming as Kompiam International School, providing quality education in a rural district.

The next seed was planted at the University of Papua New Guinea (UPNG). This was a very special seed – unique in the world and found only in Papua New Guinea. It germinated with struggle but was nurtured passionately till it bloomed into a specialist training program, which has yielded seven master of medicine specialists, specialising in rural health. As it branched further, the Department of Rural & General Medicine took emerged and is now an important department in the UPNG School of Medicine.

Another seed was planted in Papua New Guinea as the PNG Society for Rural and Remote Health. It too struggled to grow but did so eventually and is now a place for rural doctors to ‘feel at home’.

These seeds are actually smart strategies to obtain, maintain and retain doctors in the rural areas. Sure enough, we have a Department that attracts medical students into rural medicine; a graduate level Curriculum that keeps rural registrars in rural hospitals; and a professional Society that keeps the rural doctors connected.

If we are a Society of painters, we would paint a thousand pictures to speak ten thousand words of gratitude to the Mills for their passion, dedication and perseverance in improving rural medical services. They heeded to the call of God and allowed the Holy Spirit to use them to initiate, influence and impact a paradigm shift. Rural medical services is a better version now!

Prosperity is when your life becomes a blessing and healing to others. The Mills have lived a life of prosperity and we wish them more prosperous times ahead and abroad.

On behalf of a grateful Society, and a grateful nation.

Dr. Hogande Kiafuli
President – PNG Society for Rural and Remote Health.

Dr Kiafuli visiting Wara Mantz CHP facility under the EBC Church in the Middle Jimi area of the Jimi District in Jiwaka. En route to Kompiam to farewell Dr Mills.

When A Helping Hand Is Needed

Situated in the Obura-Wonenara district the Kassam Orthopedic Services began offering prosthetic services in the country from April 2022. Since then they have helped 20 people in an ascending trend.

Watch the transformation through the video on our Facebook page.https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=443540331174111

orhttps://fb.watch/g4MmbuQ4P0/

Ruben Herman, Prosthetist and Orthotist, with his wife Thea run the Kassam Orthopedic Services. They are a missionaries with EBC based at the O-Wan/Kassam district hospital. Ruben was trained in Germany and Switzerland. Through the support of donations from a church in Switzerland they are able to purchase the materials needed to provide this much needed service in Papua New Guinea.

They can create protheses for the following types of amputations:

Upper Extremities:

  • wrist disarticulation
  • transradial
  • elbow disarticulation
  • transhumeral

Lower Extremities

  • Lisfranc
  • Chopart
  • Hindfoot
  • Syme
  • Transtribial
  • Knee disarticuatiom
  • Transferral (if stump is longer than 20cm from the greater trochanter)

At the moment because of the tremendous support they have from the church they are able to offer prostheses for between K40 – K100 but can only help one patient at a time due to limited bed space availability.

Currently no medical referral letter required but if you, someone you know, is in need of a prosthesis give Ruben or Thea a call/WhatsApp on 7453 3423 .

WARANGOI – Where It’s All Happening! –

Situated in luscious Pomio District of East New Britain province the 28 bed Warangoi Rural Hospital has been undergoing some exciting changes for the better this year.

July 2022 saw Warangoi Rural Hospital take on their first 5th year medical students from the University of Papua New Guinea for their rural attachment. Since Dr Micah Misivet began working at Warangoi Rural Hospital in 2020 he had been keen to have medical students and resident medical officers do training rotations at the hospital. However, due to housing constraints it had been a struggle until recently when suitable accommodation was arranged in the local community and Warangoi saw the arrival of his first set of students. Dr Misivet was excited to have his first set of students whose presence he felt “It (would) really enhance myself and my staff academically” as having the students required guidance and teaching from them each day of their 6 week stay.

Dr Micah Misivet is the sole doctor at Warangoi Rural Hospital and with the help of his in hospital staff, 3 of his 5 functioning aid posts and health patrols, they provide healthcare to the approximately 14,686 people who reside in the 8 wards of the hospital’s catchment.

UPNG 5th Year medical students on rural block rotation
Susan Walizoba (L) and Bevris Boone (R)

A few days after the arrival of the students the internet wifi by Light Speed was installed at the hospital. Dr Misivet is a MMed Rural Medicine (UPNG) trainee. Part of the MMed Rural Medicine program’s initiative is to equip their trainees with effective, quality telecommunications capabilities to allow them to access virtual continued medical education workshops, tutorials and other online learning facilities as well as allow them to network and communicate with other fellow colleagues as rural practice can often be very isolating experience.

This new satellite set up came on the brink of the PNG Rural and Remote Health Society commencing its inaugural monthly virtual CME conferences. As a result Dr Misivet and his students were able to join that CME conference discussing Anaesthesia in the Bush.

Many of the rural or district hospitals across the country do not have reliable telecommunication services available to them. The installation of the Light Speed satellite has dramatically improved the telecommunication capabilities of Warangoi Rural Hospital. Now communication for referral of patients is more reliable and a WhatsApp referral group has been created between Warangoi Rural Hospital and the medical officers and SMOs of Vunapope Hospital and Nonga Hospital adding to this convenience. Dr Misivet uses the new wifi for internal CME conferences for all staff at the hospital as well as attending external CMEs being hosted by the UPNG and the PNGSRRH.

L-R: MBBS 5 student SusanWalizoba, Dr Micah Misivet, Dr Gabriel Yohang, MBBS 5 student Bevris Boone

Later in August saw Dr Yohang, Head of Rural and Generalist Medicine, drop by Warangoi during his East New Britain supervisory visit of Vunapope, Warangoi and Palmalmal hospitals.

As the new department of Rural and Generalist Medicine of the School of Medicine and Health Science (UPNG) establishes itself, integral to its development is ensuring its trainees – medical students, resident medical officers and MMed registrars – are well supported to achieve their training objectives. Dr Yohang’s visit was a welcome encouragement to the trainees and their respective hospitals.


Medical Officers and RMOs from Vunapope Hospital, Warangoi and Palmalmal Medical Officers with Dr Yohang